Sinopse

A weekly collection of news, developments, and stirrings in the art world with host Hrag Vartanian, cofounder and editor-in-chief of Hyperallergic.

Episódios

  • Where Did the Deepfakes Go?

    Where Did the Deepfakes Go?

    25/10/2020 Duração: 40min

    For months, media specialists, pundits, and analysts were warning us to brace for an onslaught of memes and other forms of propaganda that would flood our feeds this US election season. While there certainly have been a comparable amount of memes and videos as in 2016, the use of deepfakes — a form of artificial intelligence to make images of fake events — never quite materialized. Why?In this wide-ranging conversation, I talk to artist and technologist An Xiao Mina about the absence of deepfakes and what this might tell us about the media ecosystem now and going forward.This conversation is part of our Sunday Edition on Propaganda.The music featured this episode is a new track by Command Dos titled "Proof."Subscribe to the Hyperallergic Podcast on Apple Podcasts, or anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • Sam Durant Revisits the “Scaffold” Controversy Three Years Later

    Sam Durant Revisits the “Scaffold” Controversy Three Years Later

    23/10/2020 Duração: 34min

    A few weeks ago, artist Sam Durant released a long essay about his work, "Scaffold," which reflects on the project that dominated art world headlines. Originally commissioned for documenta (13) — the influential quinquennial exhibition in Kassel, Germany — in 2012, it wasn't until "Scaffold" was installed in the Walker Art Center's sculpture park in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, that it was met with protests by the local Dakota community.That event was a lightning rod for a national conversation about appropriation, racism, and the role of artists, museums, curators, and others in those conversation. I invited Durant to join me on the podcast to discuss the reason he wrote this so many years after the fact and what he thinks the lessons are.The music featured in this episode is the track “California Life” by Radiochaser.Subscribe to the Hyperallergic Podcast on Apple Podcasts, or anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • National Gallery of Art Director Discusses the Decision to Delay the Philip Guston Exhibition

    National Gallery of Art Director Discusses the Decision to Delay the Philip Guston Exhibition

    02/10/2020 Duração: 25min

    Last week, the New York Times reported that the National Gallery of Art's Philip Guston retrospective, expected to travel to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Tate Modern in London, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, would be delayed by four years. The reasons are many, including the limited demographics of those who worked on an exhibition that is very much about race, as well as the current cultural climate. The decision has caused = reactions of indignation and anger in some art circles, causing others to be perplexed over what seems like an overreaction to the delay of an exhibition by a very well-known artist, who is frequently shown and exhibited in spaces the world over.In this episode, the director of the National Gallery, Kaywin Feldman, shares her thoughts on the decision, why it was important, and what the National Gallery of Art will do now.The music featured in this episode is the track “California Life" by Radiochaser.Subscribe to the Hyperallergic Podcast on Apple Podcasts, or anywhere else you l

  • Amin Husain and Nitasha Dhillon on Working to Decolonize the Art World (Part 2)

    Amin Husain and Nitasha Dhillon on Working to Decolonize the Art World (Part 2)

    25/09/2020 Duração: 01h21min

    I’ve been wanting to do a major interview with Amin Husain and Nitasha Dhillon for years. As the duo behind MTL+ Collective and organizers with Decolonize This Place, FTP, Gulf Ultra Luxury Faction (GULF), and other groups through the years, they’ve played an active role in pressuring New York’s art community and institutions to deal with the issues that have long been overlooked. Though well known for organizing with a focus on worker, indigenous, Black, Palestinian, and migrant rights, both Husain and Dhillon are also artists.In this wide-ranging, two-part conversation, I speak to Husain and Dhillon, who came to our studio back in May, before the murder of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter protests that followed, about their lives, ideas, and what they think of an art community that is still grappling with notions of justice, freedom, and equality.Part one is a shorter 34-minute interview to introduce you to the pair and their lives, while part two (81 minutes) offers a closer look at their work and t

  • Amin Husain and Nitasha Dhillon on Working to Decolonize the Art World (Part 1)

    Amin Husain and Nitasha Dhillon on Working to Decolonize the Art World (Part 1)

    25/09/2020 Duração: 33min

    I’ve been wanting to do a major interview with Amin Husain and Nitasha Dhillon for years. As the duo behind MTL+ Collective and organizers with Decolonize This Place, FTP, Gulf Ultra Luxury Faction (GULF), and other groups through the years, they’ve played an active role in pressuring New York’s art community and institutions to deal with the issues that have long been overlooked. Though well known for organizing with a focus on worker, indigenous, Black, Palestinian, and migrant rights, both Husain and Dhillon are also artists.In this wide-ranging, two-part conversation, I speak to Husain and Dhillon, who came to our studio back in May, before the murder of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter protests that followed, about their lives, ideas, and what they think of an art community that is still grappling with notions of justice, freedom, and equality.Part one is a shorter 34-minute interview to introduce you to the pair and their lives, while part two (81 minutes) offers a closer look at their work and t

  • The Artistic World of the Taíno People

    The Artistic World of the Taíno People

    09/09/2020 Duração: 47min

    The Taino civilization was decimated by Christopher Columbus and other European explorers during first contact, but the legacy of these people, who inhabited what is today called the Caribbean, continues to this day.In a small exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, titled Arte del mar: Artistic Exchange in the Caribbean, Assistant Curator James Doyle showcases some of the rare wooden objects, along with the intricate gold pieces, fascinating stone stools, and other objects that have survived over the centuries. He explains what makes the artistic objects of the Taíno unique, why bats and other animals are common in the imagery, and what we know about a civilization that was drastically impacted by the devastation and genocide of European colonization.Also, some good news: the run of the exhibition has been extended until June 27, 2021.The music for this week’s episode is “The Shady Road” by artist B. Wurtz. His debut album, Some Songs, will be released on October 16 by Hen House Studios. Subscribe to t

  • Why Did the Whitney Museum Cancel a Political Art Exhibition?

    Why Did the Whitney Museum Cancel a Political Art Exhibition?

    27/08/2020 Duração: 24min

    Reporters Valentina Di Liscia and Hakim Bishara join me to discuss the Whitney Museum’s decision to cancel the exhibition Collective Actions: Artist Interventions In a Time of Change, which was scheduled to open on September 17. They both reported on the story this Tuesday, and now offer their own insights into the larger questions raised by this controversy, including how museums should collect, what role should artists have in the acquisition process, and if museums are getting better or worse at dealing with issues of racial and economic equity in their collections.This episode will get you up to speed about the fast-moving story and what it tells us about the Whitney and other contemporary museums today.A special thanks to Tyler James Bellinger for providing his track “Champagne” for this week’s episode. You can visit Apple Music or YouTube, for more information.Subscribe to the Hyperallergic Podcast on Apple Podcasts or anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • Why Does TikTok Bother the Powerful So Much?

    Why Does TikTok Bother the Powerful So Much?

    19/08/2020 Duração: 31min

    The recent news that the White House may ban the social media platform TikTok has people wondering, why? While Silicon Valley social giants, like Twitter and Facebook, have avoided similar threats, the question remains why TikTok, which is owned by a Chinese company but has headquarters in the UK and the US, is causing so much condemnation.I invite author, artist, and technologist An Xiao Mina to discuss her recent article "Break and TikTok for the Mass," and why the social platform continues to irk the powers that be. We also discuss the passing of poet Dinos Christianopoulos, whose line “They Tried to Bury Us, They Didn’t Know We Were Seeds” has become a staple of protests the world over.Thanks to YutaY for providing the music to this week’s episode. His new track “Run” is available on Apple Music and Spotify, and you can follow him on Facebook.Hyperallergic continues to be on top of the biggest stories in the art community during the pandemic. Subscribe to our daily newsletter to stay up to date.Subscribe

  • Why Would a Museum Display Skulls of Enslaved People in the First Place?

    Why Would a Museum Display Skulls of Enslaved People in the First Place?

    30/07/2020 Duração: 17min

    Recently, Hyperallergic reported that the Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania will be removing a cranial collection from display in a basement classroom. The group of crania, which was donated by a 19th-century Philadelphia-born and UPenn-educated physician named Samuel George Morton, includes many skulls of enslaved Black people. The collection is a product of racist, pseudoscientific "race science" that Morton and his peers perpetuated. Members of the UPenn community actively denounced its display at the institution for many years prior to the museum’s recent decision.Hyperallergic's news editor Jasmine Weber and reporter Hakim Bishara join me to discuss this story and what Police Free Penn, a group consisting of UPenn students and local activists, is demanding the museum abolish the collection.The music this episode is an instrumental version of "Begin Again" by Kill the Alarm.Hyperallergic continues to be on top of the biggest stories in the art community during the pandemic. Subscribe to our da

  • Should Blue Chip Art Galleries Have Received Millions of Dollars of PPP Loans?

    Should Blue Chip Art Galleries Have Received Millions of Dollars of PPP Loans?

    16/07/2020 Duração: 28min

    Hyperallergic news editor Jasmine Weber and reporter Valentina Di Liscia joined me to parse the latest PPP loan news and discuss the list of beneficiaries.Previously, we reported on galleries, museums, and nonprofits in New York and Los Angeles that received loans, and noted that the world’s most exclusive art galleries received millions of dollars of taxpayer money. In this conversation we offer some additional details and thoughts about the news.We also discuss the evolving discussion around the blurring of faces in protest photographs, following a statement issued by ICP Center Blackness Now on the need for guidelines for protest photographers. Photographer Dawoud Bey offered his thoughts in the comments of the post we published, which has extended the conversation. We share our thoughts on the topic.The music for this episode is “The One” by The Wayves.Hyperallergic is continuing to cover the biggest stories in the art community during the pandemic. Subscribe to our daily newsletter to stay up to date.Sub

  • Christopher Knight: The Critic Whose Love for LA Uplifted Its Arts Community

    Christopher Knight: The Critic Whose Love for LA Uplifted Its Arts Community

    19/06/2020 Duração: 40min

    In his current position as art critic at the Los Angeles Times, Christopher Knight has been speaking truth to power for almost four decades. He charted the contemporary art waters in a city that has since become one of the world’s art hubs before most people ever noticed. He doesn’t shy away from controversy, as his recent columns about the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s renovations suggest. This year he was awarded two special honors: the Rabkin Lifetime Achievement Award for Art Journalism and the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism.In this episode, he shares stories about his years in LA, his work as a newspaper art critic, and even a very curious letter he received from actor Charleton Heston about artist Andrew Wyeth.The music featured in this episode is the track “Zuma" by Austin David.Subscribe to Hyperallergic’s Podcast on iTunes, or anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • The Monumental Impact of Black Lives Matter Protests

    The Monumental Impact of Black Lives Matter Protests

    12/06/2020 Duração: 45min

    This week, I talk to Hyperallergic news editor Jasmine Weber, and reporters Hakim Bishara and Valentina di Liscia, to discuss some of the major stories they’ve been reporting on. Art’s role in upholding the status quo has been long diminished, but we’ve seen major developments to challenge this, including the removal of Confederate statues across the United States; the toppling of a Columbus statue in Minneapolis by members of the American Indian Movement; the decision by MCA Chicago to halt its contract with local police; celebrities advocating for justice for Breonna Taylor; and the vow by former Whitney Museum Vice Chair Warren Kanders to sell Safariland divisions that manufactures tear gas.We also discuss our editorial decision to blur the faces of protesters, as well as two important essays we published on the origins of the word “loot” and the meaning of journalistic “objectivity.”I also speak to scholar and photographer Artyom Tonoyan about what he saw during the May 29th protests in Minneapolis.Hypera

  • Our Obsession With Less and Its Co-option by Silicon Valley

    Our Obsession With Less and Its Co-option by Silicon Valley

    30/05/2020 Duração: 58min

    In this episode for Sunday Edition, we welcome Kyle Chayka to examine Silicon Valley’s taste for minimalist design. Is this just the latest development for a style that has a long history but only emerged into pop culture during the 1960s and ‘70s when a contemporary art movement emerged to propel the taste for less into a global phenomenon?Chayka's book, The Longing for Less: Living with Minimalism (Bloomsbury, 2020), is a highly readable book that examines the historical precedents of minimalist design, its incarnation as contemporary art, and how it was co-opted by architecture, design, and fashion companies to represent a new, generic sense of luxury.The music for this episode is Darkstar’s “Timeaway,” which is taken from the new album News From Nowhere, courtesy of Warp Records (warp.net/artists/darkstar).Subscribe to Hyperallergic’s podcast on iTunes, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • How the US Is Treating the Arts During the Pandemic, the #CancelRent Movement

    How the US Is Treating the Arts During the Pandemic, the #CancelRent Movement

    20/05/2020 Duração: 42min

    The best news team in art gathers for another conversation about the biggest stories facing the arts community. News editor Jasmine Weber, and reporters Hakim Bishara and Valentina di Liscia, join me to reflect on acts of solidarity across the art world, the growing #CancelRent movement, the bizarre IRS complaint filed by an attorney against the Whitney Museum, museum layoffs, a coalition of artists calling to lift Gaza sanctions, how US cities are dealing with arts funding, Frieze New York going online, and much more.Hyperallergic continues to be on top of the biggest stories in the art community during the pandemic and subscribe to our daily newsletter to stay up to date.A special thanks to Jowan Safadi for allowing us to use his track, “Super White Man,” for this episode. You can follow Saladi on YouTube, Bandcamp, or Twitter.Subscribe to Hyperallergic’s Podcast on iTunes, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • Art Critic John Yau Talks About Four Decades of Writing in New York

    Art Critic John Yau Talks About Four Decades of Writing in New York

    15/05/2020 Duração: 02h10min

    Few critics are like John Yau, who, for decades, has continued to engage with contemporary art with a voracious appetite, often focusing on figures ignored by the art market and mainstream institutions that chase after the next shiny thing. He has been part of the Hyperallergic Weekend editorial collective since it debuted in 2012.John's writing about contemporary art cuts through hierarchies and academic jargon while revealing his love of art and innovative ideas. I asked him about his life, how he got into art writing, stories from his childhood, and other influences that help us understand a writer who continues to challenge both himself and readers to look at art with fresh and informed eyes. This special two-hour interview offers a window into the world of one of the country's most respected art critics and poets.A special thanks to Vinson Valega for providing the music for this interview. You can learn more about his music at VinsonValega.com.Subscribe to Hyperallergic’s Podcast on iTunes, and anywhere

  • How Are the Arts in LA, the US Southwest, and Beyond Weathering the Pandemic?

    How Are the Arts in LA, the US Southwest, and Beyond Weathering the Pandemic?

    29/04/2020 Duração: 56min

    News about new museum layoffs and other problems, art galleries closures, and the cancellation of the Indian Market in Santa Fe are all part of this week's episode with Hyperallergic’s news editor Jasmine Weber, LA Editor Elisa Wouk Almino, and Ellie Duke, our Southwest editor based in Santa Fe, NM.We discuss the Museum of Contemporary Art's decision to furlough most of its staff and then lay off 97 part-time workers, the impact of canceling Santa Fe's Indian Market, and the launch of our series that looks at some of the Native American artists and artisans who won't be able to show at the August gathering. We also talk about images from the 1918 influenza pandemic, the complicated problems of museum endowments, and how museums the world over are slowly opening up, not to mention a few that have been forced to close again because of a new wave of infections. And on a lighter side, we discuss Alan Nakagawa's social distancing haiku project.Then I reach out to writer Anthony Majalathni in Rome, who discusses hi

  • Whats Up With Museum Layoffs, Union Problems, and Untouchable Endowments?

    What's Up With Museum Layoffs, Union Problems, and Untouchable Endowments?

    16/04/2020 Duração: 34min

    This episode, in our ongoing series tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the art community, I talk to the Hyperallergic news team (Jasmine Weber, Valentina Di Liscia, and Hakim Bishara) about the latest Pandemic-related news, including why museums can't dip into their endowments as easily as we might like, the Guggenheim's decision to furlough 92 employees, why some union supporters are crying foul with the recent art world layoffs. We also discuss the impact of the cancellation of Indian Market in Santa Fe, an artist fundraiser for Elmhurst Hospital in Queens, how artists are helping to decorate hospitals, and even some memes.A special thanks to Nathan Fox for letting us use his track “I Can’t Hang.” To learn more, check out his Facebook page.And a thank you to Gina Volpe for allowing us to use a short clip of her catchy song "Don't Touch Your Face," and for answering my questions about her inspiration.Subscribe to Hyperallergic’s Podcast on iTunes, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • The Boom in Online Exhibitions During the Pandemic

    The Boom in Online Exhibitions During the Pandemic

    09/04/2020 Duração: 55min

    This week, we give you a two-part conversation about the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on the arts community. First, we start with our news team, editor Jasmine Weber, and reporters Valentina Di Liscia and Hakim Bishara, to get updates on the flurry of news this week. Then we talk to editors Seph Rodney, Jasmine Weber, and Dessane Lopez Cassell about the new boom in online offerings by museums, galleries, and art institutions, as we try to separate the wheat from the chaff.During our news roundup we discuss various articles by the team, including the Museum of Modern Art's decision to terminate educator contracts, the Whitney Museum's decision to lay off 76 staff members, pandemic relief efforts by various foundations, the eerie visual parallels between today and the 1918 influence pandemic, and even a few lighter posts, including the Gerbil Museum that's captured the hearts of art lovers.In the final segment, Seph Rodney elaborates on what he found as an art critic visiting the new wave of online galle

  • The Pandemic’s Effects on Museums and Art Schools

    The Pandemic’s Effects on Museums and Art Schools

    01/04/2020 Duração: 32min

    Cases of COVID-19 are on the rise across the US and much of the world,  so Hyperallergic's news team gathered together for week 3 of our special podcast series to discuss what's happening at art museums, art schools, and other hubs of the art community during the coronavirus pandemic.I'm joined by Hyperallergic's news editor Jasmine Weber in Los Angeles, and reporters Valentina di Liscia in Miami and Hakim Bishara in Brooklyn to reflect on the week that was and what we anticipate ahead.Thanks to Kicholas Nage for allowing us to use his new song "Rona" this episode. You can check it out on YouTube.Subscribe to Hyperallergic’s Podcast on iTunes, and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.

  • From Rome to NYC, Audio Dispatches on COVID-19 and the Arts

    From Rome to NYC, Audio Dispatches on COVID-19 and the Arts

    25/03/2020 Duração: 35min

    Another week of unprecedented COVID-19 news dominates the headlines as the United States, and New York specifically, has slowly become one of the epicenters of a global pandemic.The Hyperallergic news team, including news editor Jasmine Weber, and reporters Valentina di Liscia and Hakim Bishara, join me for our first-ever remote podcast to discuss a wide range of topics including how museums and art galleries are advocating for support, how the pandemic is impacting life in Rome, how Whitney Museum art handlers are doing their part, and even a look at some of the viral songs that have emerged from the crisis.We will be producing a podcast weekly until the crisis is over, to document what we've been seeing, reading, and hearing about a virus that has forced inhabitants of some of the largest cities of the world to stay home. During this anxious time, as much of the world shelters in place to mediate the impact on local healthcare facilities, we work at keeping you informed about the daily realities of COVID-19

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