Sinopse

The CBRL inspires and supports the highest quality research in the humanities and social sciences in the countries of the Levant. Through its events and outreach activities, CBRL encourages the exchange and dissemination of knowledge and ideas for the benefit of all.CBRL is a non-profit organisation. CBRL Sound is currently managed by the CBRL British Institute in Amman. Comments and queries are welcome to: [email protected]

Episódios

  • Stealing from the Saracens: How Islamic Architecture Shaped Europe

    Stealing from the Saracens: How Islamic Architecture Shaped Europe

    08/10/2020 Duração: 01h10min

    A thought-provoking discussion, chaired by Venetia Porter, Curator of Islamic & Contemporary Middle East Art at the British Museum (currently on furlough), with Scott Redford, Professor of Islamic Art & Archaeology at SOAS, and Diana Darke, author of this new book. Described by The Guardian as “exhilarating and meticulously researched”, the book has created something of a stir, roundly attacked on social media by alt-right groups for whom European architecture represents ‘the pinnacle of civilisation’. The book uncovers the long yet often overlooked history of architectural ‘borrowing’, revealing the Arab and Islamic roots of Europe’s architectural heritage. Ideas and styles are traced as they passed from vibrant Middle Eastern centres like Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo, entering Europe via gateways like Muslim Spain, Sicily and Venice through the movement of pilgrims, bishops, merchants and medieval Crusaders. It is a rich tale of cultural exchange, shedding new light on the backstory of some of Europe’s

  • Germany and Israel: whitewashing and statebuilding with Dr Daniel Marwecki | September 2020

    Germany and Israel: whitewashing and statebuilding with Dr Daniel Marwecki | September 2020

    01/10/2020 Duração: 01h13min

    According to common perception, the Federal Republic of Germany supported the formation of the Israeli state for moral reasons—to atone for its Nazi past—but did not play a significant role in the Arab–Israeli conflict. However, the historical record does not sustain this narrative.  Daniel Marwecki’s pathbreaking analysis deconstructs the myths surrounding the odd alliance between Israel and post-war democratic Germany. Thorough archival research shows how German policymakers often had disingenuous, cynical or even partly antisemitic motivations, seeking to whitewash their Nazi past by supporting the new Israeli state. This is the true context of West Germany’s crucial backing of Israel in the 1950s and ’60s. German economic and military support greatly contributed to Israel’s early consolidation and eventual regional hegemony. This initial alliance has affected Germany’s role in the Israeli–Palestinian conflict to the present day. About the speaker: Daniel Marwecki is a lecturer at Hong Kong University’s

  • 20,000 years of impacts, adaptation  vulnerability in the Eastern Levant | Matt Jones | Dec 2015

    20,000 years of impacts, adaptation & vulnerability in the Eastern Levant | Matt Jones | Dec 2015

    21/09/2020 Duração: 57min

    People have complex relationships with the environments they live in and resources such as water and food are critical variables in societal landscapes, with resource scarcity potentially leading to instability or collapse. In the Levant, with its long history of human occupation and evolution, human-climate-environment interactions have been important for millennia, such that issues of resource availability and sustainability are far from new. This lecture uses case studies from eastern Jordan, from the work of the Epipalaeoloithic Foragers of Azraq Project and Eastern Badia Archaeological Project, to investigate human-climate-environment relationships through the last 20,000 years. It will also draw on examples from the wider Near East region. Working on or near archaeological sites, local environmental reconstructions, particularly of water availability, are informing regional models of human adaptation to climate change e.g. during the beginnings of agriculture, and allow the assessment of people’s impact

  • Was Jordans Black Desert green during the late Neolithic?

    Was Jordan's Black Desert green during the late Neolithic?

    10/09/2020 Duração: 01h13min

    Slides to accompany this event can be found here: https://cbrl.ac.uk/ckeditor/filemanager/userfiles/Events/Was_the_Black_desert_green_during_the_late_Neolithic/Collated_presentations.pdf Today, Jordan’s Black Desert is an area of volcanic rocks that lie above the limestones of the Transjordan plateau stretching from Jebel Druze, south-east of Damascus, across eastern Jordan and into northern Saudi Arabia. Underexplored archaeologically, the Eastern Badia Archaeological Project (EBAP) aims to record and study the architecture, artefacts, and petroglyphs of this area, to integrate the findings with biological and palaeoclimatic data in order to understand the human occupation and use of the region. After c. 6,500 BCE, the population in the Project study area appears to have mushroomed to unprecedented population density, with several sites that include Wisad Pools and Wadi al-Qattafi reaching enormous size, including hundreds of quasi-contemporaneously inhabited buildings. In this talk, the EBAP team will di

  • Palestinian Theatre in the West Bank

    Palestinian Theatre in the West Bank

    28/08/2020 Duração: 01h11min

    Since the 1990s, Palestinian theatrical activities in the West Bank have expanded exponentially. In addition to local productions, Palestinian theatre-makers have presented their work to international audiences on a scale unprecedented in Palestinian history. Author Gabriel Varghese’s Palestinian Theatre in the West Bank explores the histories of the five major theatre companies currently working in the West Bank: Al-Kasaba Theatre, Ashtar Theatre, Al-Harah Theatre, The Freedom Theatre and Al-Rowwad. The book explores how theatre-makers contest Zionist discourse and Israeli state practices in this first major account of Palestinian theatre covering the last three decades. Varghese will discuss his book with theatre scholar Kristin Flade. About the speaker: Gabriel Varghese is a former CBRL postdoctoral fellow whose research engages with anti-/post-/de-colonial theatre, performance and literature, and the questions they raise about social movements, dramaturgies of urban life, and regimes of gender, sexualit

  • Roots of Lebanons financial crisis

    Roots of Lebanon's financial crisis

    19/08/2020 Duração: 01h04min

    Lebanon is facing its worst financial crisis since independence. The government has defaulted on its ballooning public debt, high inflation is the new norm, much needed US dollars are in shortage, and thousands of bank account holders are denied their right to withdraw money. The central bank is accused of hiding real losses and appeasing rather than holding politicians and bankers accountable. New US sanctions are adding fuel to the fire of instability. How did a country that prided itself for its financial stability and a highly performing banking sector find itself in such a quagmire? This webinar will look at the roots of the crisis that run deep in the country’s history, including the role of its banking lobby in the formation of its central bank and management of the currency crisis. About the speaker: Hicham Safieddine is lecturer in the History of the Modern Middle East at King's College London. He is author of Banking on the State: The Financial Foundations of Lebanon (Stanford University Press) and

  • China and the Middle East conflicts I Guy Burton I August 2020

    China and the Middle East conflicts I Guy Burton I August 2020

    06/08/2020 Duração: 01h10min

    How do aspiring and established rising global powers respond to conflict? Since the People’s Republic was established in 1949, China has long been involved in the Middle East and its conflicts, from exploiting or avoiding them, to their management, containment or resolution. This webinar will examine China’s engagement with the region’s conflicts including: Israel/Palestine; Iraq before and after 2003; Sudan and the Darfur crisis; the Iranian nuclear deal; the Gulf crisis; and the wars in Syria, Libya and Yemen. This webinar will explore how a rising, global, non-Western power handles the challenges associated with both violent and non-violent conflict as well as the differences between limiting and reducing violence alongside other ways to eliminate the causes of conflict and grievance. About the speaker Guy Burton is Adjunct Professor at Vesalius College, Brussels and Fellow on the 'Sectarianism, proxies and de-sectarianisation' project at Lancaster University. He has previously held research and teachi

  • The spectre of annexation: a conversation with Professor Avi Shlaim I July 2020

    The spectre of annexation: a conversation with Professor Avi Shlaim I July 2020

    23/07/2020 Duração: 01h11min

    This webinar explores the roots and implications of Israel’s plans to annex up to a third of West Bank territory – a manoeuvre seen by many to represent a paradigmatic shift in the character of how the ‘Israel-Palestine’ conflict hereafter unfolds. Professor Shlaim - a leading scholar of Israel’s relations with the Arab world - will be interviewed by CBRL Kenyon Institute, Jerusalem Director Dr Toufic Haddad before opening up to questions from the audience. About the speaker: Professor Avi Shlaim is an Emeritus Fellow of St Antony's College, a former Professor of International Relations at the University of Oxford, and an elected Fellow of the British Academy. Among his many books are “Collusion across the Jordan: King Abdullah, the Zionist Movement, and the Partition of Palestine” (1988); “The Iron Wall: Israel and the Arab World” (2000, second edition 2014); “Lion of Jordan: King Hussein’s Life in War and Peace (2007)”, and; “The 1967 Arab-Israeli War: Origins and Consequences” (2012). Professor Shlaim i

  • How the West stole democracy from the Arabs I Elizabeth Thompson with Eugene Rogan I August 2020

    How the West stole democracy from the Arabs I Elizabeth Thompson with Eugene Rogan I August 2020

    17/07/2020 Duração: 01h08min

    This talk will look at how Arabs established a democratic government at Damascus in 1919-20 by forging a compromise between secular liberals, conservative Muslims, and leaders of non-Muslim communities as described in How the West Stole Democracy from the Arabs. However, the Paris Peace Conference refused to recognize Arab democracy because it threatened British and French colonial rule in other Muslim countries. By authorizing the French army to occupy Damascus, the Conference destroyed not only the Syrian government, but also future prospects for Arab democracy. The book challenges previous understandings of the impact of World War I on the Middle East that focus on nationalism as the primary outcome. Not only did Arabs seek to revive liberal constitutionalism, but they also demonstrated a political sophistication that has been erased by colonizers. The events of 1920 tainted the new regime of international law under the League of Nations with racism and sparked the rise of anti-liberal Islamism. To vi

  • What are we talking about when we talk about moderation in contemporary Jordan?

    What are we talking about when we talk about moderation in contemporary Jordan?

    03/07/2020 Duração: 01h03min

    As the discourse of “Countering Violent Extremism” has become more prominent both within the Middle East and in talk about the Middle East, so too has the concept of moderation emerged as an apparent interpretive key to understanding the region and its most pressing political and theological debates. Yet if the definition of ‘extremism’ remains controversial, the concept of moderation is all too often taken to be self-evident—even as those with disparate political and religious convictions seek to lay claim to it. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Jordan, I trace the history and contemporary social lives of Arabic-language notions of moderation like ‘itidal and wasitiyya. I seek to map out how these terms have helped foster new forms of dispute and social control even as they have been taken up by secular and religious commentators drawing on a vibrant pre-existing textual tradition. About the speaker: Geoffrey Hughes is a lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Exeter. His research explor

  • Reinventing Partnership: Reinvigorating Museum Education in Jordan

    Reinventing Partnership: Reinvigorating Museum Education in Jordan

    19/06/2020 Duração: 01h07min

    In this seminar we invite discussion on the nature of partnership building in and around the museum and heritage sector in Jordan. We reflect on our own experiences of trying to develop successful partnerships, gained during the first year of our AHRC Newton-Khalidi funded research-and-development project on ‘Learning from Multicultural Amman: Engaging Jordan’s Youth’. Here, as well as thinking critically about the challenges surrounding partnership working, we have sought to identify and experiment with new forms of partnership working: between museums; between museums and education providers; between government agencies and museums; and between Jordanian museum professionals and international experts. The accompanying presentation for this talk can be found here: https://cbrl.ac.uk/ckeditor/filemanager/userfiles/Events/Reinventing_Partnership_Reinvigorating_Museum_Education_in_Jordan_presentation.pdf About the speakers: Arwa Badran is a researcher at Durham University on an AHRC funded project on engagi

  • How British spies ruled Mandatory Palestine

    How British spies ruled Mandatory Palestine

    04/06/2020 Duração: 01h15min

    This talk surveys the first two decades of British rule in Palestine through the eyes of its intelligence services. Who were Britain’s spymasters in Palestine? How did they try to reconcile Britain’s conflicting promises to Zionists and Palestinians? Did they understand the country and its people, or did they get it wrong? This talk shows the moments where intelligence officers influenced British policy in Palestine, but also, how the now-declassified records they left behind help us understand the early years of the conflict. This talk will survey the first two decades of British rule in Palestine through the eyes of its intelligence services. Who were Britain’s spymasters in Palestine? How did they try to reconcile Britain’s conflicting promises to Zionists and Palestinians? Did they understand the country and its people, or did they get it wrong? This talk will show the moments were intelligence officers influenced British policy in Palestine, but also, how the now-declassified records they left behind he

  • Covid, Neoliberalism and the Arab Spring

    Covid, Neoliberalism and the 'Arab Spring'

    28/05/2020 Duração: 01h09min

    This event will explore the implications of the global Covid-19 crisis on the future of neoliberalism, and the ongoing struggles across the Middle East and North Africa, informally referred to as the 'Arab Spring'. This event will take the format of a conversation with Prof. Achcar, led by Dr. Toufic Haddad, Director of CBRL-Jerusalem's Kenyon Institute, and will include the chance for webinar audience members to pose questions. About the speaker: Professor Gilbert Achcar is a Professor of Development Studies and International Relations at SOAS, University of London. His many books, published in a total of 15 languages, include: The Clash of Barbarisms: The Making of the New World Disorder (2002, 2006); The Arabs and the Holocaust: The Arab-Israeli War of Narratives (2010); The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising (2013); and Morbid Symptoms: Relapse in the Arab Uprising (2016).

  • The Hundred Years War on Palestine I Rashid Khalidi I May 2020

    The Hundred Year's War on Palestine I Rashid Khalidi I May 2020

    12/05/2020 Duração: 01h24min

    The twentieth century for Palestine and the Palestinians has been a century of denial: denial of statehood, denial of nationhood and denial of history. This book is Rashid Khalidi’s powerful response. Drawing on his family archives, he reclaims the fundamental right of any people: to narrate their history on their own terms. In this book launch, Prof. Khalidi (Columbia University) discusses his book with Rana Barakat (Birzeit University). This was an online webinar held in partnership with the Educational Bookshop (Jerusalem) and the Khalidi Library (Jerusalem). About the speaker: Prof. Rashid Khalidi is the Edward Said Chair of Arab Studies at Columbia University and editor of the Journal of Palestine Studies. He is the author of seven books on the Middle East, including: Palestinian Identity, Resurrecting Empire and The Iron Cage. His writings on Middle Eastern history and politics have appeared worldwide in respected journals and newspapers. About the chair: Dr Rana Barakat is Assistant Professor of Hi

  • 1871 Survey of Western Palestine Revisited: the visible  the hidden I Salman Abu Sitta I Feb 2020

    1871 Survey of Western Palestine Revisited: the visible & the hidden I Salman Abu Sitta I Feb 2020

    02/03/2020 Duração: 01h20min

    Slides to accompany this audio are available here: https://cbrl.ac.uk/ckeditor/filemanager/userfiles/Events/Salman_Abu_Sitta_SWP/Salman_Abu_Sitta_slides_SOAS_event_February_2020.pdf The Survey of Western Palestine (SWP), conducted between 1871 and 1878 and first published in 1880, was considered the first scientifically based comprehensive survey of Palestine and it was unequalled for its time. It remained the most comprehensive survey until the end of the 19th century and even later for some purposes. However, its aims were not fully achieved. In survey terms there have been errors of accuracy, mis-spelt names and significant loss of data that was collected but not used. Its aim of describing the population of the country were particularly lacking. Military objectives became apparent towards the end of the survey and served the British army well until the First World War. Dr Salman Abu Sitta’s new revised atlas is compiled over 500 pages and corrects location errors, the spelling of names, it documents mis

  • Trumps peace plan - A first reading I Toufic Haddad I February 2020

    Trump's peace plan - A first reading I Toufic Haddad I February 2020

    06/02/2020 Duração: 50min

    President Donald Trump’s proposal for peace between the Israeli and Palestinian peoples under the spotlight at an event hosted by King’s Decolonising Working Group at King’s College London. Trump’s Peace Plan: A First Reading, a seminar led by Dr Toufic Haddad. Dr Haddad is the director for the Council for British Research in the Levant’s Kenyon Institute, based in East Jerusalem. He is the author of Palestine Ltd: Neoliberalism and Nationalism in the Occupied Territories, which explores extensively the role of international donors and the legacy of economic peace-making in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. He completed his PhD in development studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in 2015.

  • Discovery, documentation and the destruction of cultural heritage in the MENA region

    Discovery, documentation and the destruction of cultural heritage in the MENA region

    17/01/2020 Duração: 01h14min

    Sharing Passions: discovery, documentation and the destruction of cultural heritage in the Middle East and North Africa.  A tribute to Dr Andrea Zerbini (1984-2019)    Slides of this lecture to accompany the audio recording can be found here: https://cbrl.ac.uk/event/discovery-documentation-and-the-destruction-of-cultural-heritage-in-the-mena-region Archaeologists thrive on discovering places, objects or stories about the past, especially when they give us a sense of identity and meaning in our modern lives. Archaeologists also love to travel but also want to understand their roots and where they came from too. This talk will explore these aspects in terms of what it means to be an archaeologist working in the twenty-first century as well the challenges of working in the Middle East and North Africa. These include harnessing the latest technology, to help preserve the ever-threatened cultural heritage. The talk will be a tribute to the life and work of Dr Andrea Zerbini. About the speaker: Robert Bewl

  • Hamas Contained: the Rise and Pacification of Palestinian Resistance

    Hamas Contained: the Rise and Pacification of Palestinian Resistance

    19/12/2019 Duração: 52min

    'Hamas Contained' offers the first thirty-year history of the group on its own terms drawing interviews with organisation leaders, as well as publications from the group. The book maps Hamas's transition from fringe military resistance towards governance and shows how, under Israel's approach of managing rather than resolving the conflict, Hamas's demand for Palestinian sovereignty has effectively been neutralised by its containment in Gaza. About the speakers: Tareq Baconi is the International Crisis Group's Analyst for Israel/Palestine and Economics of Conflict. His book, 'Hamas Contained: the Rise and Pacification of Palestinian Resistance,' was published by Stanford University Press in 2018. Prior to joining Crisis Group, Tareq was a Visiting Fellow at Columbia University's Middle East Institute. His writing has appeared in Arabic in Al-Ghad and Al-Quds al-Arabi, and in English in The New York Review Daily, The Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, The Guardian, The Nation, The Daily Star (Lebanon), and

  • From the River to the Sea

    From the River to the Sea

    13/12/2019 Duração: 56min

    Book launch for 'From the River to the Sea: Palestine and Israel in the Shadow of “Peace”' and discussion chaired by Dr Toufic Haddad. Can anything new really be written about the century-old conflict over Palestine and the Oslo ‘peace process’ since 1993? This book proves that it can. By focusing in on specific communities, each of the contributors provide original analyses of how the past 25 years extended and solidified the power imbalance between Israelis and Palestinians under the auspices of ‘peace.’ But these chapters also chart the new forms of political expression, interaction, and mobilisation, as well as different coping strategies, that also developed during this time. Four of the book contributors will discuss their chapters – on Palestinian communities in East Jerusalem and Israel (Mansour Nasasra), on the economy of Occupied Palestinian Territory (Raja Khalidi), and on Israeli politics and society (Yonatan Mendel). The editor will introduce the main themes and rationale for the book, and her

  • People like us? The Neolithic in Southwest Asia

    People like us? The Neolithic in Southwest Asia

    13/12/2019 Duração: 01h30s

    'People like us? The Neolithic in Southwest Asia' given by Professor Bill Finlayson (University of Reading) at CBRL’s AGM and Crystal M-Bennett Memorial lecture with an introduction by Dr Andrew Garrard (UCL). The CBRL and its predecessors have played an important role in developing our understanding of the Southwest Asian Neolithic, one of the key transitions in human history, with the emergence of new forms of society that changed our relationship with the world, allowing the introduction of farming and enabling people to live in large sedentary groups. From Kenyon’s pioneering work at Jericho, to Kirkbrides excavations at Beidha, Crystal-Bennett’s excavation of the first Pre-Pottery Neolithic A settlement found in Jordan, and exploration of the eastern deserts and oases by Betts and Garrard, British research has been central to the Neolithic. However, our research is undermined by a comprehension of the Neolithic as a vital all-encompassing stage in the path to modernity, creating people like us. Current

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