Faith Works Summer Devotions

Sinopse

The Church at Station Hill Summer Podcast Series

Episódios

  • Romans | November 18, 2020

    Romans | November 18, 2020

    18/11/2020 Duração: 51min

    “There is no saying what may happen when people begin to study the letter to the Romans. So let those who have read thus far be prepared for the consequences of reading farther: you have been warned!” – NT Scholar F.F. Bruce Background of the Book of ROMANS: PAUL, dictating to his scribe, Tertius (16:22). Paul is in the seaport of Cenchrea (16:1) at Corinth at the end of his third missionary journey (after the writing of 2 Corinthians). He has finished an important stage of his missionary work; “from Jerusalem all the way around to Illyricum, I have fully proclaimed the gospel of Christ” (15:19). This geography includes all the churches he had planted on his famous mission journeys (Acts 13-20) in south Galatia (Pisidian Antioch, Lystra, Iconium, and Derbe), and in the Roman provinces of Asia (Ephesus), Macedonia (Philippi, Thessalonica) and Achaia (Corinth). · Paul is ready for his next challenge: he plans to go back to Jerusalem to bring a collection for the mother church there (hopefully healing some of th

  • James, Galatians. 1amp2 Thessalonians, 1amp2 Corinthians | November 11, 2020

    James, Galatians. 1&2 Thessalonians, 1&2 Corinthians | November 11, 2020

    11/11/2020 Duração: 01h01min

    Background of the Book of JAMES: 1. Who: James, the Lord’s brother. Four men are named James in the NT: James, the father of Judas (not Iscariot); James, son of Alphaeus, called “James the less” and one of the disciples”; James, son of Zebedee and brother of John, one of Jesus’ intimate disciples but martyred around AD 44 (Acts 12:2); and James the Lord’s brother, the most likely to have written the epistle. He was among the believers awaiting the Spirit at Pentecost and a central figure in the Acts 15 Jerusalem Council. 2. When: James may have been the earliest writing in the New Testament, probably in 46-49 AD, especially since it does not mention anything of the Jerusalem Council of 49 AD 3. Whom: “The twelve tribes scattered abroad”, so Hebrew Christians scattered outside of Palestine, and expressions in the letter fit an originally Jewish leadership. 4. What: The characteristics of true faith. The purpose of the work is practical rather than doctrinal or apologetic as James challenges the believers to ex

  • Acts | November 4, 2020

    Acts | November 4, 2020

    04/11/2020 Duração: 53min

    Background of the Book of ACTS: 1. Who: Luke, a Gentile Physician who “writes with the compassion and warmth of a family doctor.” The “we” portions of Acts (16:1-17; 20:5-21:18, 27:1-28:16) subtly reveal that Luke was a traveling companion of Paul. Luke was with Paul during both of his Roman imprisonments as Paul’s “beloved physician” (Col. 4:14, Philemon 24, 2 Tim. 4:11), evidence of Luke’s loyalty even in the face of personal danger. Luke is the only Gentile contributor to the New Testament. Church tradition tells us that Luke was from Syrian Antioch, remained unmarried, and died at 84 years old. 2. When: Luke likely wrote during Paul’s first imprisonment in Rome, during the mid-to-late 60s. Luke’s abrupt ending that ends with Paul awaiting trial in Rome leads many to believe it was completed prior to Paul’s trial (AD 62). In addition, it gives no hint of the persecution under Nero (64), Paul’s death (68) or the destruction of Jerusalem (70). 3. Whom: Luke’s carefully written gospel was presented to “the mo

  • The Gospel of John | October 28, 2020

    The Gospel of John | October 28, 2020

    28/10/2020 Duração: 44min

    Background of the Gospel of John: 1. Who: John, brother of James, who together form the “sons of thunder”, a slight contrast to the gentle physician Luke. Father was Zebedee. Mother was Salome who served Jesus and was present at His crucifixion (Mark 15:40-41).  John evidently started among the Galilean followers of John the Baptist who were called to follow Jesus (1:91-51) and were later called to be His disciples. John was among the twelve selected to be apostles (Luke 6:12-16). After Christ’s ascension, John became a “pilar” of the church along with James and Peter (Gal 2:9). He is mentioned three times in Acts (Acts 3:1, 4:13, 8:14), each time in association with Peter. Tradition says John went to Ephesus and was eventually exiled to Patmos by the Romans for a time (Rev 1:9). 2. When: John was written after the last synoptic gospel (66-68), and with his 3 epistles and Revelation written after this gospel, so that writing probably occurred between 68-90 AD. 3. Whom: John writes to everyone, possibly t

  • The Gospel of Luke | October 21, 2020

    The Gospel of Luke | October 21, 2020

    21/10/2020 Duração: 48min

    Background of the Gospel of LUKE: 1. Who: Luke, a Gentile Physician who “writes with the compassion and warmth of a family doctor” as he carefully documents the life of Jesus. The “we” portions of Acts (16:1-17; 20:5-21:18, 27:1-28:16) subtly reveal that Luke was a traveling companion of Paul. Luke was with Paul during both of his Roman imprisonments as Paul’s “beloved physician” (Col. 4:14, Philemon 24, 2 Tim. 4:11), evidence of Luke’s loyalty even in the face of personal danger. Luke is the only Gentile contributor to the New Testament. Church tradition tells us that Luke was from Syrian Antioch, remained unmarried, and died at 84 years old. 2. When: Luke wasn’t an eyewitness of the events in his gospel, but he relied on the testimony of eyewitnesses and written sources (1:1-4). It’s highly likely that during Paul’s 2- year imprisonment in Caesarea Philippi that Luke gathered information from eyewitnesses for his gospel, especially from Mary, mother of Jesus. Luke likely wrote during Paul’s first imprisonme

  • The Gospel of Matthew | October 14, 2020

    The Gospel of Matthew | October 14, 2020

    14/10/2020 Duração: 44min

    Background of the Gospel of Matthew: 1. Matthew, while not chronologically the first written. Is the first gospel presented in the New Testament as it serves as a bridge between the Old and New Testaments. It was composed by Matthew the apostle in AD 60-65. The gospel was written by a Jew, about a Jew, for Jews. 2. Mark’s Kingdom of God is replaced with Kingdom of Heaven in the Jew’s deference to the name of God being unspoken. 3. Matthew’s key idea is Jesus as King, starting from the genealogy carrying through the entire text. Matthew’s key term is “fulfilled”, as Jesus’ life and ministry are shown as the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies time and again. 4. Matthew’s Story: · While Mark was a deserter during Paul’s mission journeys, Matthew was even less popular: he was tax collector in Capernaum for the Roman government – essentially a traitor to his own people in many eyes. Tax collectors would extract extra money from their own people to fund a lavish lifestyle. · He responded quickly to Jesus’ call

  • The Gospel of Mark | October 7, 2020

    The Gospel of Mark | October 7, 2020

    07/10/2020 Duração: 45min

    Background of the Gospel of Mark: 1. Mark is the shortest, simplest, and earliest of the four Gospels. It was composed by John Mark in AD 55-65 to a Roman audience using primarily Peter’s firsthand accounts and reflecting his own action-oriented personality. 2. Mark uses the “historic present tense” 151 times and the word “immediately” 42 times! 3. Mark’s Story: · Mark’s mother Mary had a large house in Jerusalem that was used as a meeting place for believers (Acts 12:12). Peter was at this house often, because the servant girl recognized his voice at the gate (12:13). · Many scholars believe that John Mark anonymously writes about himself as the “rich young ruler” (10:17-22) and as the “young man” who flees without his garment in the Garden of Gethsemane (14:51-52). · Barnabas was John Mark’s cousin (Col. 4:10), but Peter might have been the person who led him to Christ (1 Peter 5:13). · Barnabas and Saul took Mark along with them on their first mission journey (Acts 13:5) but for some reason, Mark turned ba

  • Intro to the Gospels - September 30, 2020 (Live)

    Intro to the Gospels - September 30, 2020 (Live)

    01/10/2020 Duração: 49min

    The New Testament has arrived! After 400 years of prophetic silence, voices call to God’s people, announcing the arrival of the promised Messiah. From our Read Through the Bible book: “The inspired explanation of this scene comes from the Apostle Paul: “When the completion of time came God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the law” (Gal 4:4). Everything is ready. The announcement of the King’s birth comes first to the virgin Mary and then to Joseph, her betrothed. Jesus’ genealogies show that He descends from Adam (as we all do), but through his adoptive father’s lineage He is David’s royal heir as well. He is fully human; He is also fully God: “The Word became flesh and took up residence among us” (Jn 1:14). Jesus grows up in obscurity; then He begins His ministry by being baptized by John.”

  • Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther

    Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther

    23/09/2020 Duração: 43min

    Congratulations! This is our final week in the OLD TESTAMENT. We are still in act 2, scene 9, which is set in the period after the Israelites returned from exile in Babylon. This week watch for at least four key themes: 1. God honoring leadership 2. Return to covenant faithfulness 3. Religious identity 4. God's sovereign care for His people

  • The Prophets Part 7: Haggai, Zechariah amp Malachi

    The Prophets Part 7: Haggai, Zechariah & Malachi

    16/09/2020 Duração: 50min

    New Scene! Scene 9: In this scene the world’s superpowers shift again. The Persians rise and grant the Israelite captives permission to return home. Ezra and Nehemiah become great leaders. No Davidic king reigns, but the prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi speak for God. The second temple is built. Jerusalem gets new walls. God’s people (now called Jews) resolve to live by His laws. Esther acts bravely, keeping the Jews from extinction. World history will unfold as Daniel prophesied: Persia will fall to the Greeks; the Greeks will give way to Rome. Act 2 ends with us longing for the curtain to rise on the next scene.

  • The Prophets Part 6: Daniel

    The Prophets Part 6: Daniel

    09/09/2020 Duração: 51min

    Daniel: Prophet Profile · 605 B.C. – 535 B.C, Daniel’s life and ministry bridge most of the 70-year period of Babylonian captivity. · Daniel was a young man is born into a noble Judean family and then is carried off in exile at age 16 to serve the Babylonian Empire in their program of assimilating the best and brightest of their vassal states. Daniel serves the remainder of his life in exile. · Daniel was a contemporary of Ezekiel who mentioned him three times (9:23, 10:11,19) as an example of righteousness. While Ezekiel emphasizes the nation’s religious restoration, Daniel concentrates on its political restoration. · Daniel’s name means “God is my judge.” · He is one of the few well-known biblical characters about whom nothing negative is recorded. His life was characterized by faith, prayer, courage, consistency, and lack of compromise. Jesus calls Daniel a prophet (Matt. 24:15).

  • The Prophets Part 5: Ezekiel

    The Prophets Part 5: Ezekiel

    02/09/2020 Duração: 45min

    Ezekiel: Prophet Profile · Prophets are given by God the ability to see through things: such as time, space, and…pretense. These words are certainly true for Zeke. · The name Ezekiel (Yehezke’l) means “STRENGTHENED by God.” · Like Jeremiah, Ezekiel was a priest who became a prophet during some of Judah’s darkest days. He was privileged to receive visions of the power and plan of God and he was careful and artistic in his written presentation. His wife died as a sign to Judah when the final siege on Jerusalem began (24:16-24). · Ezekiel was taken to Babylon in the second deportation from Jerusalem in 597 B.C. He received his first vision five years later. Ezekiel’s prophetic ministry spanned about 25 years, from approximately 592-570 B.C. He died in 560 B.C. · Ezekiel preached and wrote to the exiles in Babylon, compared with Jeremiah who remained in Jerusalem. Ezekiel’s Babylonian home was Tel Abib, the colony/refugee settlement of the Jewish people in Babylon along the Chebar River, also known as the “Grand

  • The Prophets Part 4: Jeremiah and Lamentations

    The Prophets Part 4: Jeremiah and Lamentations

    19/08/2020 Duração: 47min

    Jeremiah: Prophet Profile · The son of Hilkiah the priest from a village about 2 miles north of Jerusalem (Anathoth) · His name means “Yahweh throws” in the sense of laying a foundation. It can also mean “Yahweh establishes, appoints, or sends.” · His ministry started around 627 under King Josiah and stretched to about 580 B.C. · Three Stages to His Ministry: o 627-605 B.C. – He prophesied while Judah was threatened by Assyria and Egypt o 605-586 B.C. – He proclaimed God’s judgment while Judah was threatened and besieged by Babylon o 586-580 B.C. – He ministered in Jerusalem and Egypt after Judah’s downfall · He was a contemporary of Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Daniel and Ezekiel. · His nickname is the “weeping prophet” (9:1) because he often bathed his harsh prophecies in tears of compassion. Jeremiah’s life was difficult: he wasn’t allowed to marry, he faced opposition from his hometown, beatings, punishment in stocks, isolation and imprisonment. He preached forty years without a single “convert.” · He had a secre

  • The Prophets Part 3: Nahum, Zephaniah, Habakuk amp Joel

    The Prophets Part 3: Nahum, Zephaniah, Habakuk & Joel

    05/08/2020 Duração: 43min

    · God’s People are now divided, and the Northern Kingdom (usually called “Israel” has been conquered by the Assyrians. The Southern Kingdom “Judah” (also Jerusalem) is struggling with faithfulness as the Assyrians fade and Babylonians rise in power. · God raises up prophets to indict and convict the people for breaking both the covenant as well as His commands. The Ten Commandments are organized into two “tables.” The first table deals with right relationship with God. Sadly, the Israelites often falter here and worship many idols. The second table emphasizes right relationships with others, because justice, integrity, and truth matter to God. The people typically fail at these too. God appoints prophets to challenge the religious and political leaders. This makes them unpopular figures in their own day and age. · These prophets are usually categorized into “major” and “minor.” This does not have to do with their importance or reliability, but rather their length. · The prophets are some of the of the most mi

  • Isaiah

    Isaiah

    22/07/2020 Duração: 41min

    Introduction: “Descendants of David continue to reign in Jerusalem. Judah struggles to retain independence amid the swirling change of political superpowers. Two kings stand tall for the Lord: Hezekiah and Josiah. Many others fall into idolatry. Mighty Assyria crumples before resurgent Babylon. Nebuchadnezzar enters the world stage and attacks Judah. During this scene God’s prophets continue the dire warnings of their predecessors. Isaiah and Jeremiah are the best known. They also foretell events both near and remote. Isaiah’s word about the Suffering Servant and Jeremiah’s prophecy of a new covenant wait to be fulfilled in the first coming of the messianic King, recounted early in Act 3.“ - Guthrie, George H.. Reading God's Story

  • The Prophets Part 1: Jonah, Amos, Hosea, and Micah

    The Prophets Part 1: Jonah, Amos, Hosea, and Micah

    08/07/2020 Duração: 46min

    Introduction: · God’s People are now divided: The Northern Kingdom is usually called “Israel” (also Samaria or Ephraim) and the Southern Kingdom “Judah” (also Jerusalem). Israel has no “good” kings. Judah has only a few. · God raises up prophets to indict and convict the people for breaking both the covenant as well as His commands. The Ten Commandments are organized into two “tables.” The first table deals with right relationship with God. Sadly, the Israelites often falter here and worship many idols. The second table emphasizes right relationships with others, because justice, integrity, and truth matter to God. The people typically fail at these too. God appoints prophets to challenge the religious and political leaders. This makes them unpopular figures in their own day and age. · These prophets are usually categorized into “major” and “minor.” This does not have to do with their importance or reliability, but rather their length. · The prophets are some of the of the most misunderstood and overlooked bo

  • The Kingdom Divided | June 24, 2020

    The Kingdom Divided | June 24, 2020

    24/06/2020 Duração: 38min

    The Ten Commandments are organized into two “tables.” The first table deals with right relationship with God. Sadly, the Israelites often falter here and worship many idols. The second table emphasizes right relationships with others, because justice, integrity, and truth matter to God. The people typically fail at these too. In this extended scene, God responds. He divides Israel, diminishing the power of the remaining kingdoms. Then He sends Assyria to destroy the northern kingdom. Furthermore, He appoints prophets to challenge the religious and political leaders. Read Amos, Hosea and Micah with an ear for how they address God’s concerns for both tables of the Law.

  • Coffeehouse Theology Podcast Summer Edition #2 (King Solomon)

    Coffeehouse Theology Podcast Summer Edition #2 (King Solomon)

    11/06/2020 Duração: 42min

    Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Ecclesiastes

  • Coffeehouse Theology Podcast Summer Edition #1 (The Psalms)

    Coffeehouse Theology Podcast Summer Edition #1 (The Psalms)

    27/05/2020 Duração: 41min

    Today is a historic day!  For the first time ever, Coffeehouse Theology isn’t taking a break over the summer.  Instead, for our “summer edition” we are going bi-weekly and shorter (35 minutes or so).  Why?  We’re going all the way through the Bible in 2020 and we didn’t want to miss a single book of the Bible.  We hope giving you the “big picture” of each book as well as looking at a handful of key Scriptures will help you stay connected and engaged.  This week’s conversation covers 1 Chronicles and Psalms.

  • Coffeehouse Theology May 13, 2020

    Coffeehouse Theology May 13, 2020

    13/05/2020 Duração: 01h04min

    From the series Coffeehouse Theology | Scripture Reference:

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